About learning foreign languages by listening tools

To talk about anything else
ten_zero
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by ten_zero » 27 May 2016, 11:40

schwarzgrau wrote: I would love it to be more similar. It would really nice to speak at least a little bit Japanese. I bought a Rosetta Stone Japanese training when I was 13, but I never learned more than Inu, Neko, Shōnen, On'nanoko. I was in Japan in September and learned Arigatōgozaimasu, Gomen nasai, sumimasen etc. But you can't build a sentence with it, at least if you don't want to apologize to a cat.
Why ? I think you can to say for apologize, thanks or comfort in Japanese ; if you ask to take a shot with cat in Japanese language as same as Deutsch "Danke schöen" "Bitte schöen" "Entschuldigung" and "Verzeihung" etc..

Basical greeting sentences is simple but most important thing for life. No border.


"arigato, neko-chan (thank you for my picture model, sweety cat)." "jama wo site gomen-ne (when the cat was sleeping or eating)."
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As you understand many Germany vocabulary translated a word of foreign origin as make a written "KATAKANA".
From music, history, medical sciense, industry, literature, art, food, Lied ... especialy "Sinfonie Nr. 9 d-moll op. 125" from Anime to Friedrich von Schiller origin text.

Freude On the Go (Kennzeichnung: 4+ / A Germany self-education iOS app by Beethoven Symphony No.9 “Choral” lyrics )
 https://itunes.apple.com/de/app/mobairu ... d916128583

Spoiler : including Japanim trailer :




My first contact with Goethe poem was a kindergarten "music" class by education TV program.
Like this (with "toi toi toi" ).


The latest Germany & Austrian classical music education program for kindergarten in 2016.

ten_zero
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by ten_zero » 30 May 2016, 14:03

Today I met an interest thing.

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http://dictionary.sanseido-publ.co.jp/d ... mple04.pdf (Japanese edition official sample PDF)

A translated in Japanese book that the World Guide to Gestures published in England, 1994.
There are many contents : One of gesture means completely opposite between Spain & France and Italy, Germany or Finland ... and many disagree commentary with for the East.
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Now I have a question.
How do you cope with your works gesture for a different body language market ?
Almost Disney and Dreamworks products seems to do nothing (keep on their culture's way) but many video games changes their character's gesture, scripts and 3DCG textures (including Nintendo and SEGA).

One of a famous scene
In the West : Come on! 8) / In my opinion : Go away !! :x
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Last edited by ten_zero on 30 May 2016, 14:12, edited 1 time in total.

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Fabrice
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by Fabrice » 30 May 2016, 14:10

How do you cope with your works gesture for a different body language market ?
If possible, I try to imitate the person in front of me, but it's pretty difficult to do, mostly because I need to think about what to say + translations.
Fabrice Debarge

Elodie
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by Elodie » 31 May 2016, 01:28

Fabrice wrote:
How do you cope with your works gesture for a different body language market ?
If possible, I try to imitate the person in front of me, but it's pretty difficult to do, mostly because I need to think about what to say + translations.
The same here.

For instance, my first time in Japan, when someone gave me his card, even if I knew the common rules (take it with 2 hands, bow a little, read the card...), I always put it -carefully- in my purse.... Until I realized most people I met actually kept my card on the table.

Now, I always do the same and I put the cards in my purse when the meeting is over. =)

ten_zero
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by ten_zero » 31 May 2016, 03:58

Now, I always do the same and I put the cards in my purse when the meeting is over. =)
:shock:
Madame, I recommend you to go MUJI and select "card case for business" that required separate cards from "purse" ; when you visit Hiroshima, Kansai, Haneda and Narita airport (MUJI to GO awaiting for you) or MUJI Paris, MUJI Germany (near from Metz than Paris) and MUJI Poland for lesson :wink:

Porte-cartes de visite :
A metalic case is better for the first impression but a polyethylene case is careless for every countries ‎baggage inspection/metal detector gate.
 http://www.muji.eu/pages/online.asp?Lan ... =15&Sub=64
 http://sklep.muji.com.pl/ (for increase your Polish daily necessities word power that compare with MUJI France)
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If you take the card (as your name, your avatar) in/out your purse, that means "I am / You are not worth to do business with you/me (like this 1 yen / 1 centime coin)" in the Eastern.
 

* Using a leather card case ; the best way for reserve your client avatar (card).
 

Near the furure when "do paperless than traditional manner / privacy information / Wi-Fi security risk" for Grobalim, you can exchange digital card by iPhone/Android phone.
 

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Fabrice
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by Fabrice » 31 May 2016, 07:35

My 2 cents :
some of the people we use to meet in Japan just don't have cards.
the animation industry is not as rigid as some other business.
Fabrice Debarge

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slowtiger
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by slowtiger » 31 May 2016, 07:43

Japanese animators don't have business cards. They have large flipbooks which you're obliged to watch from the first to the last frame.
TVP 10.0.18, Mac Pro Quadcore 3 GHz, 16 GB RAM, OS 10.11, QT 7.7.3

ten_zero
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by ten_zero » 31 May 2016, 11:47

some of the people we use to meet in Japan just don't have cards.
the animation industry is not as rigid as some other business.
Japanese animators don't have business cards. They have large flipbooks which you're obliged to watch from the first to the last frame.
Gentlemen, are those reply put me to adaptable person test of Europian "Witz / esprit" or "Sarkasmus / Ironie" ? :(
If you met free-lance Japanim animators who has a carrier over 3 years / joins studio for a thirteen-week period (cours) TV series, they always carry private cards / portfolio / SNS ID for self promotion or next screening.

/* all cards exhibit on internet but address converted dummy */
Spoiler : :
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Elodie
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by Elodie » 31 May 2016, 13:40

Fabrice was serious. People in animation (including Japanese) do not always have cards and even less card case. Actually, it sounds very pretentious in this market when you have a card case.

Slowtiger was surely joking or thinking about something he actually experienced.

By the way, I meant purse as a handbag (where I put the most valuable and important things, like my passport, my phone and my wallet).

ten_zero
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by ten_zero » 31 May 2016, 14:10

Fabrice was serious. People in animation (including Japanese) do not always have cards and even less card case. Actually, it sounds very pretentious in this market when you have a card case.

Slowtiger was surely joking or thinking about something he actually experienced.
Merci beaucoup for analyses ; seriously I will dislike about these tease style.
By the way, I meant purse as a handbag (where I put the most valuable and important things, like my passport, my phone and my wallet).
Is it not to classify "a billfold" for purse (for coin), wallet (for paper money), pocketbook (paper monen plus credic card) with card case (business card) in EU or North/South America ?
Excuse me, I did not understand about your "wallet" means "a evening (for business) bag".

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Fabrice
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by Fabrice » 31 May 2016, 18:43

ten_zero wrote:Gentlemen, are those reply put me to adaptable person test of Europian "Witz / esprit" or "Sarkasmus / Ironie" ? :(
No, I was serious (I won't speak instead Slowtiger about his own sentence, it's a joke but I'm not 100% sure about the idea behind it).
I met quite a lot of people in the japanese animation industry during the last 10 years, in both France and Japan.
I can say that about 1/3 of them didn't show me a business card.
Fabrice Debarge

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slowtiger
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by slowtiger » 31 May 2016, 18:54

Of course that was a joke! Here in Europe Japanese are famous for being very formal. But the animators from all over the world I've met in Stuttgart were just the opposite - even when they exchanged business cards. (Only a few actually had business cards, many more had postcards with some info and artwork from their films, and some contact information.)
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ten_zero
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by ten_zero » 01 Jun 2016, 01:59

Of course that was a joke!
I understand why the people did not show a private card...

"Intouchables (2011/France)" was a "for all ages" movie in EU, but rated 18+ : verbal violence, drug addiction, racial discrimination, criminal act in Asia & Japan (R12+).
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CANAL+ "Les Guignols de L'info" : violate public order and standards of decency in Asia (especialy Japan).
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Remember If you think "it was a joke", a grown up people in different culture take "it is a affront" both with words and gesture : And vice versa , we know the United Nations and many the intellectual overseas senior always make plans for a prohibition Japanim / Manga from an ethical standpoint for education.

BBC:The godmother of manga sex in Japan
  • TEZUKA Osamu's rule : Never use insult word, play a trick and depict for other nation culture on your products.

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Fabrice
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by Fabrice » 01 Jun 2016, 08:58

Ten-Zero,
Markus is german, I don't think the french film " intouchables " and the very french TV serie " les guignols de l'info " are relevant for him.
Fabrice Debarge

Elodie
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Re: About learning foreign languages by listening tools

Post by Elodie » 01 Jun 2016, 11:24

Plus, I would add that French and German humour are quite difference : the first one mocks people with clichés, the second one is more about situations.

Ten_Zero, you disapprove French humour because it's not your culture.

Les Guignols de l'info are very satirical : they critic government and mock other people, even the French.
For instance,"American" folk is always represented as Silvester Stallone, who always talks about French people as "Les fromages qui puent" (Stinky cheeses).

That's the strength of French humour : we mock other and we also know to mock ourselves. That's something Japanese fellows will probably never be able to do (you don't mock other, so you don't know how to make fun of yourselves).

So it's up to you : you can try to understand or at least, tolerate it, konwing that there is nothing against you personally, but don't expect us to change our behaviour.

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